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FORSETH – The strengths and weaknesses of B.C.’s political parties

A COUPLE of days ago a fellow former B.C. Conservative posed a question(s) to me regarding the organizational strengths and weaknesses of each of the four political parties in B.C. … the Liberals, the Greens, the NDP, and the BC Conservatives. He wasn’t looking for a deep in-depth analysis, just a quick summary.

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-7-48-33-pm“Interesting,” said I, upon which I replied back with the following before I had a chance to over-think my responses. I just thought I would take a moment a share them with you. Here goes:

In your opinion what are the organizational strengths of the B.C. Liberals?

Honestly I think it is simply that it ‘appears’ to be the only game in town. It can draw from across the political landscape of municipal and regional district leaders and politicians …leaders of community groups … businessmen and women and the like.

What are their organizational weaknesses?

The negatives of that apparent strength, is that they serve only those in positions of power, the business elite, those with the money to bankroll their election campaigns, etc. Everyday people feel a bigger and bigger disconnect from having any say in government plans and operations that affect their everyday life.

In your opinion what are the organizational strengths of the B.C. NDP?

Union donations and labour expertise to help in campaigns and getting the vote out.

What are their organizational weaknesses?

While they can identify and get committed voters out, like the B.C. Liberals I believe there is a disconnect with everyday British Columbians as well.

The B.C. Liberals have done an effective job in painting them as the party of “No,” however at the same time they (the Liberals) have taken no steps to show who technical, trades, and others can benefit from getting projects off the ground. The B.C. Reform Party nearly succeeded in 1996 by drawing people in from both the centre right, and centre left, however they failed to realize that they could not run a full provincial campaign their first time out.

Any new party MUST build its core, find its best riding for electing MLAs, and THEN and ONLY then show what it can do to attract broad support province wide.

In your opinion what are the organizational strengths of the B.C. Greens?

A very defined support base.

What are their organizational weaknesses?

A very defined support base that leaves little room to cross into mainstream.

In your opinion what are the organizational strengths of the B.C. Conservatives?

There are none … nearly all who had any skills have left / fled the party.

What are their organizational weaknesses?

Infighting … lack of planning … no financial resources … no expertise in government and policy … no ‘positive’ social media presence … no connect with the media … a lack of professional and management advisors … a perceived / real closed shop clique of do it my way or else individuals.

Again, this wasn’t intended to be an in-depth analysis, just quick observations.

It also might be interesting to note that the person that posed the question(s) to me, earlier this spring, also said to me, “I’m frustrated with the argument that we (B.C. Liberals) are conservative, because we balance budgets by raising taxes, and we pay for things by continual rate increases.” Which perhaps leaves credence to my statement that the perception is there that the B.C. Liberals are the only game in town?

In Kamloops, I’m Alan Forseth.

Alan Forseth is a Kamloops resident and former member of the Reform Party of Canada, the B.C. Reform Party and the B.C. Conservative Party. His blog is My Thoughts on Politics and More.

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About Mel Rothenburger (6877 Articles)
ArmchairMayor.ca is a forum about Kamloops and the world. It has more than one million views. Mel Rothenburger is the former Editor of The Daily News in Kamloops, B.C. (retiring in 2012), and past mayor of Kamloops (1999-2005). At ArmchairMayor.ca he is the publisher, editor, news editor, city editor, reporter, webmaster, and just about anything else you can think of. He is grateful for the contributions of several local columnists. This blog doesn't require a subscription but gratefully accepts donations to help defray costs.

3 Comments on FORSETH – The strengths and weaknesses of B.C.’s political parties

  1. Alan Forseth // October 10, 2016 at 10:33 AM // Reply

    And as I stated at the start, this was not intended as a deep study analysis

  2. Alan Forseth // October 10, 2016 at 10:32 AM // Reply

    Definitely not an endorsement, just they are the facts as I see them. FYI … I have not voted Liberal in over 2 decades

  3. I’m sorry, but this column seems more like an endorsement of the Liberals than an objective study of all of BCs parties.

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