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LETTER – American university students pay their share of taxes

Re: Editorial, Why international students should and must pay more, Jan. 15, 2019

As a U.S. student, this is pretty offensive, though it is not trying to be. It suggests that U.S. students don’t pay taxes.

In fact we pay more in taxes individually than most other international students and other Canadian students as we are not eligible for certain tax exemptions and must count other things as income due to FATCA and FBAR.

Furthermore, I come from a state where Canadians who graduate high school within my state can get in state tuition; the same opportunity is not afforded U.S. citizens with disability or dead parents (Canadians don’t face these disqualifying factors).  It is very hurtful to deny these very real hardships faced by many.

MATTHEW DOUGLAS BUTLER

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About Mel Rothenburger (6810 Articles)
ArmchairMayor.ca is a forum about Kamloops and the world. It has more than one million views. Mel Rothenburger is the former Editor of The Daily News in Kamloops, B.C. (retiring in 2012), and past mayor of Kamloops (1999-2005). At ArmchairMayor.ca he is the publisher, editor, news editor, city editor, reporter, webmaster, and just about anything else you can think of. He is grateful for the contributions of several local columnists. This blog doesn't require a subscription but gratefully accepts donations to help defray costs.

1 Comment on LETTER – American university students pay their share of taxes

  1. Bronwen Scott // February 5, 2019 at 11:14 AM // Reply

    FATCA and FBAR are both taxes paid to the US treasury. The argument for charging foreign students more is that they (and their parents) don’t pay taxes in Canada, not that they don’t pay taxes in their own country. I can’t understand the penultimate sentence–is the writer saying Canadian students who attended a US high school are treated better by US universities than American students who are disabled or whose parents are deceased?

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